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House Appropriations Committee
Chairman Rodney Frelinghuysen
Website address: http://appropriations.house.gov/

Fiscal Year 2018 Labor, Health and Human Services, Education Funding Bill
Invests in essential health, education, and job development activities
The fiscal year 2018 Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education (LHHS) funding bill includes funding
for programs within the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, the Social Security
Administration, and other related agencies.
In total, the bill includes $177.1 billion in discretionary funding, which is an increase of $16 billion above the
fiscal year 2017 enacted level. The bill targets investments in opioid abuse reduction, medical research, public
health, biodefense, and important activities that help boost job growth. The legislation also includes several
provisions to rein in unnecessary regulations, and to protect the sanctity of life.
Opioid Abuse Treatment and Reduction –
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$1 billion in new funding for grants to States and Indian tribes to address the opioid epidemic.
$476 million (+$350 million) at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to support increased
opioid overdose surveillance and prevention activities at the national, state, and local level;
At least $500 million in research on opioid addiction supported by the National Institutes of Health;
$130 million for the Rural Communities Opioid Response program, aimed to reach hard-hit rural
America and target the unique issues associated with substance use disorder in rural areas.

Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) – The bill includes a total of $78 billion for HHS in
budget authority, an increase of $10 billion above the fiscal year 2017 enacted level. The legislation targets
funds to effective, proven programs that help improve the health, safety, and quality of life for Americans.
Within this amount, the bill includes:


National Institutes of Health (NIH) – The bill provides a total of $37 billion for NIH, an increase of
$3 billion above the fiscal year 2017 enacted level.
The bill provides increases for several critical research initiatives, including:
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$1.8 billion (+$414 million) for Alzheimer’s disease research,
$400 million (+$140 million) for the Brain Research through Application of Innovative
Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) initiative,
$290 million (+$60 million) for the All of Us research initiative (formerly called the
Precision Medicine Initiative),
$10 million (+$8 million) for regenerative medicine research,
$100 million (+$40 million) for research to develop a universal flu vaccine,
$351 million (+17 million) for research on combating antibiotic-resistant bacteria,
$543 million (+27 million) for Clinical and Translational Science Awards, and
$351 million (+$17 million) for Institutional Development Awards (IDeA).

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Within the total, the legislation includes $300 million for the Cancer Moonshot and $12.6 million for the
Gabriella Miller “Kids First” pediatric cancer research initiative.
The bill supports a new multi-year Down syndrome research initiative that will expand NIH support for
research on Trisomy 21 and related diseases and disorders.
The bill also includes a provision requiring NIH to continue reimbursing grantee research institutions for
facilities and administrative costs.


Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) – The legislation includes a total of $8.3 billion
for CDC – an increase of $1.1 billion above the fiscal year 2017 level. This includes $801 million in
transfers from the Prevention and Public Health Fund and $240 million in transfers from the
Nonrecurring Expenses Fund.
Funding within the CDC includes $1.45 billion for CDC’s Public Health Preparedness and Response
programs – an increase of $45 million. This will ensure that the Strategic National Stockpile and State
and Local Preparedness capacity are adequate. These programs provide supplies and response efforts in
the event of a bioterror attack or pandemic disease emergency.
The bill includes increases for several CDC programs that support chronic and infectious disease
prevention and surveillance,
The bill also includes $480 million for construction of a new biosafety level 4 laboratory at CDC that
will support critical biodefense research.



Substance Abuse and Mental Health Administration (SAMHSA) – The bill funds SAMHSA at
$5 billion – $1.3 billion above the fiscal year 2017 enacted. The legislation maintains a prohibition on
federal funds for the purchase of syringes or sterile needles, but allows communities with rapid increases
in cases of HIV and Hepatitis to access federal funds for other activities, including substance-use
counseling and treatment referrals.
SAMHSA funding includes:



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$1.9 billion for the Substance Abuse Block Grant – the same as last year.

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$89 million for Criminal Justice activities – an increase of $11 million above last year –
including $70 million specifically for drug courts.

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The bill includes more than $1.7 billion to address opioid and heroin abuse, which is an
increase of $1.5 billion above last year. This amount includes $500 million for the state opioid
response grants authorized in the 21st Century Cures Act, along with funding for programs
authorized in the Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act.

Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) – The bill includes $7 billion for HRSA,
$550 million above the fiscal year 2017 enacted level. The amount includes:
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$315 million for the Children’s Hospital Graduate Medical Education, an increase of
$15 million above the fiscal year 2017 enacted level.

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$110 million (a $7 million increase) for the Healthy Start program – and $652 million (and
$10 million increase) for the Maternal and Child Health Block Grant.



Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) – The recommendation provides $334 million
for AHRQ, which is $10 million above the fiscal year 2017 enacted level.



Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) – The recommendation provides $4 billion for
CMS administrative expenses, which is the same as the fiscal year 2017 enacted level. This level is
sufficient to maintain all core operations and services.



Administration for Children and Families (ACF) – The bill provides $28 billion in discretionary
funding for ACF, which is $4 billion above the fiscal year 2017 enacted level.


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Early childhood programs receive an increase of nearly $3 billion. Head Start receives $9.9
billion, a $610 million increase, and the Child Care and Development Block Grant receives
$5.2 billion, a $2.4 billion increase.

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The bill maintains funding for Preschool Development Grants at $250 million, the same as the
fiscal year 2017 level.



Administration for Community Living (ACL) – The bill funds ACL at $2.2 billion, which is
$178 million above last year. This amount includes: $59 million for senior nutrition programs, of
which $246 million is for the Meals on Wheels program, an increase of $19 million.



Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund (PHSSEF) – The bill provides $1.95 billion for
PHSSEF, an increase of $436 million above the fiscal year 2017 level. This includes:
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$710 million, an increase of $200 million, for Project BioShield, for the acquisition of medical
countermeasures;
$537 million, an increase of $25 million, for the Biomedical Advanced Research and
Development Authority (BARDA);
$250 million, an increase of $193 million, for pandemic influenza preparedness to maintain flu
vaccine manufacturing facilities and develop flu vaccines, therapeutics, and diagnostics;
$57 million, an increase of $7.5 million, for the National Disaster Medical System; and
$265 million, an increase of $10 million, for Hospital Preparedness grants.

Department of Labor (DoL) – The bill provides a total of $12.2 billion in discretionary appropriations for DoL
– $129 million above the fiscal year 2017 enacted level. The bill provides increased funding for job training
programs and sufficient funding for labor enforcement and benefit protection agencies to fulfill their core
missions.


Employment Training Administration (ETA) – The legislation provides ETA with $10 billion – an
increase of $44 million above last year’s enacted level. This total includes $2.8 billion for job training
grants to states, $89.5 million for YouthBuild, and $145 million for apprenticeship grants.



Job Corps – The bill provides $1.7 billion for Job Corps, an increase of $14.5 million over the 2017
enacted level. Funding is included in addition to amounts provided in fiscal year 2017 for physical
facility safety and security improvements.

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Veterans Employment and Training Service (VETS) – The bill provides $295 million for VETS,
which is $16 million above the fiscal year 2017 level. This includes increases of $5 million for state
grants, $5 million for the Transition Assistance Program, and $5 million for the Homeless Veterans
Reintegration Program.

Department of Education – The bill funds the Department of Education at $70.9 billion, which is $2.6 billion
above the fiscal year 2017 enacted level.


Special Education – The bill includes $12.3 billion for IDEA special education grants to states, an
increase of $275 million over the fiscal year 2017 enacted level, which will maintain the federal share of
special education funding to states.



Student Support and Academic Achievement State Grants – The bill includes $1.1 billion, $700
million above the fiscal year 2017 level, for grants that provide flexible funds to states and school
districts, including to expand school-based mental health services and supports; for bullying prevention;
and for professional development for personnel in crisis management and school-based violence
prevention strategies.
o The bill also includes an additional $186 million, an increase of nearly $35 million for other Safe
Schools programs.



Pell Grants – The maximum Pell Grant award is increased to $6,095, funded by a combination of
discretionary and mandatory funds.



Impact Aid – The bill provides more than $1.4 billion for Impact Aid, an increase of $86 million above
the current enacted level.



Charter Schools – The bill increases funding for charter schools by $400 million, to a total of $58
million.



TRIO and GEAR UP programs, which help first-generation college students prepare for, enter, and
complete college, are increased by $60 million and $10 million, respectively, bringing TRIO programs
to a total of $1.01 billion and GEAR UP to a total of $350 million.

Other Related Agencies –


Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) – The bill includes $768 billion for
CNCS, $32 million above the fiscal year 2017 level.



Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB) – The bill provides an advance appropriation of
$465 million for CPB for fiscal year 2020, which is the same level of advance funding provided in fiscal
year 2017.



National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) – The bill includes $274 million for NLRB – the same as
last year’s enacted level.
Social Security Administration (SSA) – The bill provides $12.9 billion to SSA for administration – an
increase of $480 million over last year. This funding increase supports IT modernization as requested by
the Trump Administration and targeted funding to reduce the backlog of disability adjudication hearings.
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Published on : 2018-11-05 18:23:48
File Name : 03.21.18_fy18_omnibus_-_labor_health_and_human_services_-_summary.pdf
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Publisher :appropriations.house.gov

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